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Hanja Korean (한자/한문한자 /)

Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or hanja-eo refers to words which can be written with hanja, and hanmun refers to Classical Chinese  writing, although "hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because hanja never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyujitai  characters. Only a small number of hanja characters are modified or unique to Korean. By contrast, many of the Chinese characters currently in use in Japan (kanji) and Mainland China have been simplified, and contain fewer strokes than the corresponding hanja characters.

Although a phonetic Korean alphabet, now known as hangul, had been created by a team of scholars commissioned in the 1440s by King Sejong the Great, it did not come into widespread use until the late 19th and early 20th century. Thus, until that time it was necessary to be fluent in reading and writing hanja in order to be literate in Korean, as the vast majority of Korean literature and most other Korean documents were written in hanja. Today, hanja plays a different role. Scholars who wish to study Korean history must study hanja in order to read historical documents. For the general public, learning a certain number of hanja is very helpful in understanding words that are formed with them. Hanja are not used to write native Korean words, which are always rendered in hangul, and even words of Chinese origin  hanja-eo are written with the hangul alphabet most of the time.

(Ref: Wikipedia)

Hanja on whatamieating.com

To find foods and foods and food-related items in whatamieating.com in Hanja Korean you may search by any of the following terms:
Asia Asian Hangul Hanja Korea Korean North Northern South Southern Chinese character characters

These terms associated with languages are hidden behind the scenes as there is some crossover with other languages. The traveller in Korean may not be precisely certain which language is in use, and can search using more general terms such as 'Koirean''.

You may use any of the above terms in any search you make using 'Translate from English' so that if you wish to search for a translation of dog soup, choose whichever of these language terms that you think is most appropriate, say:
'Hanja dog soup' and then click on 'Translate from English'

One of the problems of providing searches in a multilingual world-wide food dictionary is trying to help people reach the things they are searching for. People do not always know the precise language being used, so these more general searches such as  'Korean' may help in a successful search.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanja

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