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Indigeous Australian

Indigenous Australian languages comprise several language families and isolates native to Australia and a few nearby islands, but by convention excluding Tasmania. The relationships between these languages are not clear at present, although substantial progress has been made in recent decades.

In the late 18th century, there were between 350 and 750 distinct Aboriginal social groupings, and a similar number of languages or dialects.[citation needed] At the start of the 21st century, fewer than 200 indigenous languages remain and all except roughly 20 are highly endangered. Of those that survive, only 10%, usually located in the most isolated areas, are being learned by children. For example of the 5 least endangered Western Australian Aboriginal languages, 4 belong to the Ngaanyatjarra grouping of the Central and Great Victoria Desert. Bilingual education is being used successfully in some communities; in one case recently near Alice Springs, white teachers were required to learn the local language, and Aboriginal parents complained that their children were not learning English at school. A couple of the most populous Australian languages, such as Warlpiri and Tiwi, have around 3000 speakers.

The Tasmanian people were nearly wiped out early in Australia's colonial history, and their languages went extinct before much was recorded. They were separated from the mainland at the end of the last ice age, and apparently went without contact with the outside world for 10,000 years. Too little is known of their languages to be able to classify them, although they seem to have had some phonological similarities with languages of the mainland.

Indigenous Australian languages on whatamieating.com

To find foods and foods and food-related items in whatamieating.com indigenous Australian languages you may search by any of the following terms:
Aboriginal Aborigine Aborigines Antipodean Antipodes Australia Australian Indigenous

These terms associated with languages are hidden behind the scenes . In some cases people will not know that they are using an indigenous Australian word, so a search for 'Australian' should be successful.

You may use any of the above terms in any search you make using 'Translate from English' so that if you wish to search for a translation of apricot, choose whichever of these language terms that you think is most appropriate, say:
'Aborigine black bean' and then click on 'Translate from English'

One of the problems of providing searches in a multilingual world-wide food dictionary is trying to help people reach the things they are searching for. People do not always know the precise language being used, so these more general searches such as  'Australian' may help in a successful search.

Also included in the glossary are dishes from the cuisine of the region, cookery terms, cooking methods, drinks, food festivals, days of the week, months of the year etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_Australian_languages

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